Before you read this, please read my first article, “Why Dogs Submissively Urinate?”  Submissive urination is most common among younger dogs although it can be found in older dogs who have been abused, are afraid of punishment, loud voices or one that has a great deal of fear.  These subjects will be discussed in later articles.  As mentioned, the good news is that usually the dog outgrows submissive wetting.  But while you are patiently waiting for that to happen there are some things that will help the progress along.

Some  dogs with submissive urination haven’t yet developed mature social skills. Others have a lack of self confidence, have a need to apologize or feel insecure.  Many are perfectly adjusted and are oblivious to the urination.  But one thing is for sure, no dog submissively urinates to be spiteful or contrary.   Submissive wetting is simply the dog’s way of showing submission to the human.

Never punish or correct a dog for submissively wetting.  Punishment or yelling will make the situation worse and there’s an excellent chance the urination will increase.  So think before you act.  Like I said, if you even think of punishing the dog for submissive urination, roll up a newspaper and smack yourself in the head or go to the mirror and scold yourself.  Punishment is wrong; here’s what you should do. [click to continue…]

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Puppies and Training Beginning Dogs

Does your dog do any of these things?

> Runs the other way when you call
> Backs up when you try to get him
> Plays catch me; jumps on people
> Barks & howls at strangers or cars
> Yelps at people at the front door
> Whines when he doesn’t get his way
> Pulls on the leash
> Digs, chews household items
> Uses your home as a bathroom
> Cries when you leave; is too needy
Never think Your Puppy is Too Young or too old to learn

If you need training classes, please consider our Academy of Dog Training Adventures.
We offer a range of classes to suit all ability levels.  Check our Class Schedule for current class lists and to register.

Why You Should Start Training Early

Starting at only six weeks of age, a puppy is capable of the full use of his senses such as sight, hearing and smell and begins to store the information that he will use to form his life-long personality with positive and negative responses. This is why waiting to train a puppy until he is 6 to 12 months old is a mistake. Young or old, any dog can be trained at any time but your puppy is assimilating information at a heightened rate when young.

Training early allows the owner to take a proactive rather than a reactive approach. We believe you should encourage & praise good behaviors and take preventative measures before bad behaviors happen. However, we know this whole training process can be a bit difficult because young pups aren’t fully vaccinated until just after 12 weeks of age. These young pups should not be taken around other dogs until you have checked with your vet to make sure they are totally safe and fully protected.

Little Dogs Can Be Very Demanding

We have seen some tendency for owners to think small, cute dogs are more manageable than big dogs and do not require as much training. Quite the contrary. What starts out to be a cute mischievous activity by a young pup can turn into an annoying problem as a pup ages. Small dogs can be very demanding often barking, whining, not coming when called, chewing, going potty in the house and even biting. Early behaviors become more pronounced and established as a pup ages and they may not go away without patient, encouraging and persistent training.

Be the Respected Alpha Leader

We Don’t Just Teach the Commands: Sit, Down, Come, Stay

Dogs expect owners to be knowledgeable, loving & fair leaders. If owners don’t step up to learn and assume the alpha role, than dogs can think leadership belongs to them. Although dogs basically have the brain capacity of a very young child, they combine their intelligence with instincts and from puppyhood, become highly astute at watching the owner’s every move and figuring out how to get what they want. Who is ruling your home anyway?

Doggie Socializing is Critical Doggie and Day Care Can Help

Here at Doggie Care Resort we see quite a few dogs who are fearful or shy either because they have never been boarded, were born shy or more likely have never been socialized around other dogs.

Our professional, experienced trainers have an excellent success record at helping these dogs learn to love exploring and paling around with other dogs. Offering your dog the opportunity to learn the joys of canine socializing and the wonders of canine play is one of the nicest things you can do for your dog.

Our Training Classes are Unique

Here at are our Academy of Dog Training Adventures, many of our classes go beyond teaching obedience & the commands. Depending on what classes you take, you will learn how to be the respected leader and find out why that’s so important. You will learn how your dog thinks and why there can be communication problems. We share our knowledge in how to care for your dog, and why quality nutrition can add a great percentage to the life & wellness of your dog while by-products and many ingredients can decrease health.

Because of our great love of dogs, we want your dog to have a long and happy life with you. At times, we will host veterinarians, canine nutritionists, groomers and quality trainers from other companies for educational purposes. These seminars are not part of our class structure, but are intended for continuing education.

Our Doggie Day Care is at Your Service

You will have your dog probably 15 to 17 years. Throughout his life, mental exercises such as in training will tire a dog more than physical exercise, but it is the combined great nutrition with mental & physical stimulation that maintains health and happiness.

Begin the Dog Training Adventure with your dog at our Academy of Dog Training Adventures.

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Puppies sleep most of the time during the Neonatal Period which covers from birth to two weeks of age.  Although puppies are born blind and deaf, their senses of touch and scent are fair.  It doesn’t take long before they are able to crawl and find the warmth of the mother dog and their brother and sister litermates.   Generally to get the new born puppies to eliminate, the mother dog will lick and wash the pup to get the blood flow working.

Always wash your hands before handling a newborn.  Clean and sanitize the bed area two to three times a day and make sure the puppies are kept warm at about 85 to 90 degrees. Keep them away from chills which can be fatal.  Newborns have trouble regulating their body temperatures and can get hypothermia fairly easily; however, after the first four days you can gently decrease the temperature. 

Puppies double their weight the first week and generally gain 10 to 15% of their birth weight daily which is considered healthy.   Since they feed about every two hours during their first week of life, seeing a newborn with a rounded tummy is a good thing.   During the first 21 days, pups are totally dependent on their mothers.  However they grow rapidly and by two weeks they are standing.  By one month they walk, play and run.  And by four and one-half weeks they will be starting to eat solid puppy food softened with either water or milk.    They will spend their early time staying warm, developing social skills and feeding.  The mother dog provides everything the puppy will need but make sure the mother is producing enough milk.  When the mother leaves the bed, make sure she is gone only 20 minutes and that the pups stay warm.  [click to continue…]

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The puppies have only been in this world for about two to three weeks now.  But that first two weeks of life easily can be compared with an entire human infancy and that describes the rapid speed of puppy growth that is typical in the canine world. 

This particular litter of puppies is lucky. The knowledgeable, caring breeder is handling them several times a day for eight minutes to get them used to being handled. She blows in their faces to let them smell her breath.  Even the new owners are stopping by, washing their hands first and then handling the dogs.  Yes, the puppies may have been born blind and deaf but they will remember those human scents since they were born with an acute sense of smell and their memory is developing like crazy right now.

At only three days old these pups had their dewclaws removed and their tails docked. These miniature schnauzers additionally had their ears cropped since these dogs were bred to hunt rats. If rats are in a pack, they are known to band together and attack a mini schnauzer’s ears and tail.   Therefore, the practice of docking and cropping the mini schnauzer was started about 110 years ago for their health and well being. [click to continue…]

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Puppies, maybe lots of puppies can be born in one litter.  Female dogs move into heat about every six months.  Smaller dogs generally have only a few puppies while larger breeds can have 13 or even 15 starving puppy mouths to feed at once.  It’s a busy time for a mother dog, but even though she has never had a litter before, she is instinctively ready.  One of the puppies is still tiny after a few days but is already yapping away in the corner.  Did you know that a noisy puppy is more likely to grow up to be a noisy adult?

Don’t worry, this young puppy started receiving rules, limitations and boundaries from the first day of life from mom, the caring dog.  It is these very rules that makes the puppy feel secure, safe and maybe a little too confident.  [click to continue…]

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This is the fourth article in my four part series about bringing home puppies:

  1. Before you bring the puppy home
  2. Fear imprint stage
  3. New home: a scary place
  4. The first night

Puppies and getting a new pup: “What was I thinking”?   You have baggy red eyes, yup, you get up and go look in the mirror.  You look awful.   It’s time for you and the pup to be sleeping but instead it’s almost midnight and you haven’t had a wink.  This is your new puppy’s first night with you. The pup has moved from a low whine to yelping now. Has he lost his noodle; will he ever go to sleep?  This first night alone is a night of terror for the pup, where is his mommy?  It’s a night of terror for you too; it’s terrifying to think you might not ever get to sleep again, not ever. Should you be concerned?  Well, yes and no.  You’ll be tired tomorrow but things will improve.

Should you pick the little fur child up and comfort the poor little thing?  Egads, no, absolutely no way.  If you do make that mistake, you will have just taught the pup that whining is good.  The pup will think, “geez, this is good, every time I whine she picks me up so now I’ll whine even more and much louder…. yelp, howl, screech”.  Picking up the pup while he is whining is the first step in teaching the puppy to run the house for you and he’ll be more than happy to do it.  Dogs basically have the brain of a two year old.  Do you really want a two year old running your house? [click to continue…]

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This is the third article in my four part series about bringing home puppies:

  1. Before you bring the puppy home
  2. Fear imprint stage
  3. New home: a scary place
  4. The first night

Puppies arriving home can be very frightening to the pup.  Your new puppy is arriving home probably between the age of 8 to 10 weeks old which is just the time he is entering the important Fear Imprint Stage as discussed in Tip 2.  Your puppy’s brain is at its peak rate of growth between the amazingly young age of only 8 to 16 weeks.   Remember that your puppy will age much more quickly than a human. Consequently,  this eight week old puppy is functioning at the equivalent of a human adult level of learning in terms of his ability to absorb information. Do not underestimate the fact that he is learning every minute and with every action that is happening.

That’s right, let me repeat this, an eight week old puppy is learning at nearly the equivalent of an adult, human level.   And, in fact, by the time the pup is just 16 weeks old, the ease in which he learns will noticeably start to decline (read our next few articles for more information on this).    So when this new eight week old pup enters your home for the very first time, make sure every experience is positive and that nothing scares him.  [click to continue…]

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This is the second article in my four part series about bringing home puppies:

  1. Before you bring the puppy home
  2. Fear imprint stage
  3. New home: a scary place
  4. The first night

Puppies arriving at their new home, what a frightening experience.    Here’s an example:  Let’s say that beyond your control, you are ordered to go colonize Mars. Yes, Mars, not exactly close to home and up0on arrival you truly realize how alone and helpless you have become.  Sounds far out, yes?   Well, do you suppose a puppy could feel a bit like that when suddenly rousted from the only secure home he has ever known?  Suddenly his siblings and trusted mother are gone and he is plunked at a strange house with scents that are completely unfamiliar.  There is no way for him to get back to his secure and protective, canine mother.

And to adding to the complexity, the pup is just entering the highly critical Fear Imprint Stage which hits him between 8-10 weeks old.   The first of two fear stages is entering his life at exactly the same time you are taking your eight-week-old puppy home.  What does this mean?  Well, it means that you strongly need to protect this puppy and not allow anything to scare him.  What scares the puppy during the Fear Imprint Stage has every potential of staying with him for the rest of his life and could cause issues such as deep shyness, anti-social behavior or even biting later in life. So how do you handle this situation?   [click to continue…]

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This is the first article in my four part series about bringing home puppies:

  1. Before you bring the puppy home
  2. Fear imprint stage
  3. New home: a scary place
  4. The first night

Puppies are arriving home and tomorrow is the big day.   Your puppy is so cute, are you ready?  Well, there’s nothing to it, or is there?   Here are some tips you probably haven’t thought about.  You already got the blanket, bed, food, dish, leash so isn’t that enough?   You already know that the pup has had a round of shots as recommended by the vet and the puppy is at least eight weeks old so that’s good.  

Hopefully, you have read that a pup can develop a deep shyness or a fearful aggression towards other dogs if leaving his mother and siblings before the age of seven weeks.  Between the ages of 6 to 7 weeks of age is the crucial time for a pup in developing highly important social skills with other dogs and these skills will be what he uses throughout his lifetime.  But this pup is eight weeks old, so you are fine.  You got the shot record from the breeder plus the dog’s registration papers, if any.   Now here’s the proper senario for arriving at your home. [click to continue…]

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